Writing for a Popular Audience

I'll be hosting a brown bag discussion at my home institution, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, on November 6, 2013 from 1-3PM in Sage Labs 3510 on writing for a popular audience. I plan on covering the following topics:

  1. Theory in under 1000 words
  2. How to Write about Current Events
  3. Venues & Audiences
  4. Examples of different venues & their intended audiences
  5. Writing Publicly as a PhD 
  6. Pitching your Work to an Editor
  7. CVs, Hiring & Tenure 
  8. Twitter and the Writing Process
  9. Where your Work goes in Social Media
  10. Blogging under imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy & talking to the press
  11. Q&A

If you're in the area it'd be awesome if you showed up. Equally awesome would be written stories and anecdotes about your own experiences. I'm especially interested in the experiences of women and people of color who are blogging on the regular. 

Resources

Indicator Venues worth watching: Gawker, New York Times' Technology Section, and The Verge.

My essay: "You Won't Believe What This Web Site Does to the Liberal Left!

Examples of personal web sites that are heavily cited: danah boyd's "apophenia" , Zeynep Tufekci's "Technosociology", and Nathan Jurgenson

Places that accept unsolicited submissions or are open to pitches: JacobinN+1 , The New InquiryThe State, Cyborgology, and Sociological Images.

Aggregators and news sites: The Daily Dot, OWNI.eu, Huffington Post, The Civic Beat, The Browser. Arts & Letters Daily, The Daily Dish, Digg, and Metafilter.

Tools for reading and collecting existing content: Instapaper, Readability, Feedly, Digg Reader, and Buffer

Writing with Twitter: Jessie Daniels's "From Tweet to Blog Post to Peer-Reviewed Article: How to be a Scholar Now" and Rob Horning's "The taste of circulation"

Just Publics @365 Fall MediaCamp Workshops on Twitter for Academics 

David's presentation slides